Putin is taking center Stage in the Middle East but what is his real agenda?

Moscow’s military campaign in Syria is relying on supply lines that require air corridors through both Iranian and Iraqi air space. The only alternatives are naval supply lines running from Crimea, requiring a passage of up to 10 days round-trip. How long that can be sustained is unclear.

Early on the morning of Sept. 30, a Russian three-star general approached the American embassy in Baghdad, walked past a wall of well-armed Marines, to deliver face-to-face a diplomatic demarche to the United States. His statement was blunt: The Russia military would begin air strikes in neighboring Syria within the hour — and the American military should clear the area immediately.

It was a bout of brinksmanship between two nuclear-armed giants that the world has not seen in decades, and it has revived Cold War levels of suspicion, antagonism and gamesmanship.

With the launch of airstrikes in Syria, Russian President Vladimir Putin instigated a proxy war with the U.S., putting those nation’s powerful militaries in support of opposing sides of the multi-polar conflict. And it’s a huge gamble for Moscow and quite difficult and logistically complex. The Russians don’t have much in the way of long-range power projection capability.

That and other questions about Russian military capabilities and objectives are taking center stage as Putin shows a relentless willingness to use military force in a heavy-handed foreign policy aimed at restoring his nation’s stature as a world power. In that quest, he has raised the specter of resurgent Russian military might — from Ukraine to the Baltics, from Syria to the broader Middle East.

VLADIMIR Putin is preparing to send 150,000 troops to Syria in a bid to wipe out the evil Islamic State once and for all.

The Russian leader is reportedly mounting an enormous military mission to take control of the terror group’s stronghold of Raqqa.

The city is the self-declared capital of ISIS in Syria and is patrolled by as many as 5,000 jihadi members.

Putin is set to mobilize 150,000 reservists who he conscripted into the military earlier this week.

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It is very clear that Russia wants to sweep up the west of the country, taking Raqqa and all the oil and gas resources around Palmyra. Putin knows that this is fast becoming a race to Raqqa – to secure the oil fields they need to cleanse the region of insurgents, and the IS capital is vital to do that while Obama stance and strategy is to .

It comes a day after Russian jets obliterated nine ISIS outposts in just 24 hours using bunker-busting bombs.

Russian jets pounded terrorist targets and blew up a command center, potentially killing dozens of fighters.

Confirming the successful raids, Andrei Kartapolov from the Russian army vowed to ramp up the pressure, saying: “We will not only continue strikes… We will also increase their intensity.”

And Russian Defense Ministry spokesman Igor Konashenkov said: “Over the past 24 hours, Sukhoi Su-34 and Su-24M fighter jets have performed 20 sorties and hit nine Islamic State installations.

A bunker-busting BETAB-500 air bomb dropped from a Sukhoi Su-34 bomber near Raqqa has eliminated the command post of one of the terror groups, together with an underground storage facility for explosives and munitions.

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These and other highly exact means of attack in recent days have been used to target objects of Islamic State terrorists. It is reported that these command posts, stores of weapons and oil products, workshops where weapons of suicide bombers are made.

Meanwhile a terrorism expert revealed that ISIS have vastly exaggerated their military strength and called on Western leaders to launch a coordinated fightback which would obliterate the hate group.

Has ISIS become its own worst enemy with its campaign of terror against the West, which has prompted an international backlash?

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Other reports from those strategists say it won’t take very long at all to drive them, if not out of all of Iraq or Syria, then certainly the majority of their territories.

“They will hide in towns, but I would say do not to follow them as they would use innocent civilians as human shields.”

David Cameron initially gave the Russian air strikes a cautious welcome and said the UK would need to look very carefully at Putin’s operations. David Cameron said Russia was targeting anti-Assad rebels over Daesh militants.

David Cameron Has said Russian President Vladimir Putin is making a terrible mistake by sending jets to prop up Syrian tyrant Bashar al-Assad.

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The Prime Minister said most of the Russian airstrikes in Syria appeared to have been in areas not controlled by Islamic State but by other opponents of the regime.

He told the BBC the Russians were “backing the butcher Assad, which is a terrible mistake for them and for the world. It is going to make the region more unstable. It will lead to further radicalization and increase terrorism.asaadputin

“I would say to them: ‘Change direction, join us in attacking Isil, but recognize that if we want to have a secure region, we need an alternative leader to Assad’.”

But yesterday he warned the intervention is making the situation worse and helping to support the “butcher” president Bashar Assad.

Separately Mr. Cameron pledged to “beef up” the SAS and double the number of British drones to combat ISIS militants in an interview ahead of today’s Conservative conference.

The Prime Minister said investment in Special Forces and surveillance was essential to meeting the terrorist threat facing the UK.

He revealed that the UK will buy a fleet of 20 new Protector Drones capable of targeting IS extremists in Iraq and Syria.

The Russians called it Center 2015: a series of military exercises they carried out in mid-September involving some 95,000 troops. In contrast to common practice, Moscow outlined publicly with great specificity what type of exercises its troops conducted. Its Hind attack helicopters, for example, practiced rocket and bombing runs against ground targets and provided air cover at very low altitude to ground forces. They fired unguided rockets against military columns below. They practiced flying with one engine off—simulating engine failure—at just 650 feet above the ground.

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Whether Russia’s incursion into the increasingly deadly Syrian civil war was foreseeable or not—and if it was, whether it was deterrable—is now moot. Russian President Vladimir Putin has in an instant changed markedly the course of a conflict that has claimed at least 250,000 lives and displaced millions—numbers that may yet grow much higher. Moscow and Iran, Damascus’s heretofore primary benefactor, are now making it clear that they are all-in when it comes to defending the current regime. On September 21, Iran began dispatching hundreds of elite Quds Force soldiers—the expeditionary arm of Iran’s Revolutionary Guard—as well as its leader, Qassem Suleimani, to lead ground assaults backed by Russian airpower against the forces opposing Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. They have since been joined, according to intelligence reports, by deployments of Iranian and Iraqi Shiite militias.

They are there for a very specific reason, which is not simply to combat ISIS. By October 5, in fact, the Pentagon had become convinced that the majority of Russian air strikes thus far had targeted not ISIS units, but U.S. trained rebel groups in various parts of the country. The Russian troops are there to combat anyone and everyone who might fight against Assad, who the U.S. and its coalition partners still insist has to go. Indeed, on September 29, at the United Nations, Saudi Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir could not have been clearer: “Assad has no future in Syria. Any attempt to whitewash him or make him acceptable is a nonstarter,” he told reporters.

The Russian intervention, as President Barack Obama, al-Jubeir and everyone else involved understands, comes at a critical moment. Despite the relative passivity and ineptness of the United States in funding and training anti-Assad rebels, the dictator’s position was slowly eroding as he attempted to fight off multiple rebel groups of varying sectarian and ethnic stripes (everything from hard-core ISIS fighters to more “moderate” Sunnis to Syrian Kurds). For Putin, a man who says repeatedly—because he believes it—that the greatest “geopolitical catastrophe” of the 20th century was the demise of the Soviet Union.

But from Moscow’s perspective, there likely was more to it than that—much more. The move provides a foothold in a part of the world that the Soviet Union was kicked out of four decades ago. At a moment when the United States appears to be washing its hands of the increasingly bloody and chaotic region, it gives Russia an expanding military presence in the Mediterranean on the doorstep of a NATO ally (its newly established airfield at Latakia in eastern Syria sits just 75 miles from the border with Turkey), and the gambit may yet serve as leverage with the West as Putin seeks to get out from under economic sanctions imposed as a result of Moscow’s annexation of Crimea in Ukraine.

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Is Putin’s actions game-changing? Obama seemed less impressed—or less willing to congratulate the Kremlin on its cunning, at least in public. All this was done out of a position not of strength but of “weakness,” he said at a White House news conference in early October. “This is not a smart strategic move on Russia’s part.”

Throughout much of the Middle East, that declaration was met with howls of derision (for reasons that we will get to); at home, it was dismissed by many as petulant spin from a president who had been badly wrong-footed in this war. But whether Obama had been wrong-footed or not, the logic behind what he said is not obviously wrong. That Syria’s a snake pit couldn’t be more obvious. And it’s true, as sources in Moscow and the Middle East acknowledge, that if Russia decides more troops are needed to bolster its position, it may be drawn into a quagmire it can ill afford.

Despite a still-grim economy in Russia, Putin remains popular in his country. Most of what he does to show that Moscow is a serious player on the world stage only buttresses that good opinion. But the public appetite for a war against anti-Assad rebels in Syria appears limited, to say the least.

In Sunni Arab capitals around the Middle East, one word is being uttered with increasing frequency: “Afghanistan.” Not the ongoing post-9/11 U.S. war there, but the one before it: when the mighty Soviet army was driven out by jihadi rebels (who were funded by Saudi Arabia and other Gulf Arab states) and armed by the United States. As a student of what is known in Russia as the “catastrophe,” Putin knows that the humiliating Soviet withdrawal came in 1989, after a decade of war.

By 1992, his beloved Soviet Union ceased to exist. He also knows that the same countries that aided the Afghan rebels in the 1980s are now funding anti-Assad rebel groups.

So should the United States just say, “After you, Vladimir Vladimirovich? Be our guest! Syria’s all yours,” as GOP presidential front-runner Donald Trump, among others, has advocated? If at least part of Putin’s plan is to combat ISIS—which, after all, the U.S. seeks to “degrade and destroy”—shouldn’t we welcome Moscow’s intervention, as Secretary of State John Kerry indicated Washington might?

The reasons why that’s probably a terrible idea are numerous. The deployment of the Russian military and increased Iranian ground forces means Assad can stay in power for as long as his two patrons desire. At the same time, there is also little evidence that the axis supporting Assad has the wherewithal to crush the Sunni-backed rebel groups.

It’s hard, therefore, to draw anything but the grimmest of conclusions. Syria—already a “geopolitical Chernobyl,” as former CIA chief David Petraeus recently put it—is about to get worse. Is it possible that the advent of Russian reinforcements is likely only to cement a brutal stalemate that has driven millions of people from their homes, radicalized the region, cause a humanitarian apocalypse, and turn Syria into a magnet for global jihadists?

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The Russian move into Syria will only deepen concern among Washington’s traditional allies in the Middle East about U.S. goals in the region. Israel, Jordan, Saudi Arabia and other Gulf monarchies have all watched, with varying degrees of alarm over the last five years, as the Obama administration zealously pursued a nuclear deal with Iran, an archenemy to all of those countries. Obama did so over their strenuous objections. Many suspect—indeed, some are convinced—that his overarching goal in the region was to legitimize Iran, integrate it into the international system so as to, as his stance was back in 2014 to create an “equilibrium” between “Sunni, or predominantly Sunni, Gulf states and Iran in which there’s competition, perhaps suspicion, but not an active or proxy warfare.”

If Obama’s goal was to get Iran to that place, starting with a nuclear deal, how likely was it that he was going to attack Syria in the wake of its chemical attacks, even having drawn a “red line” in 2012? Similarly, Tehran didn’t want a more aggressively funded and trained Western-backed rebel force in Syria, and Obama hasn’t done much to provide one. Had there been some firm action, we would not be in the place we are in.

This relative inaction has bred toxic suspicions throughout Washington’s traditional allies in the region—suspicions that are rarely voiced publicly but have hardened over the past 18 months. Simply put, they believe the Obama administration has not just pulled away from the Middle East but rather switched horses—backing Iran in search of that equilibrium the president spoke of last year. The White House has consistently and furiously denied this.

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Now, with Putin in Syria and Obama just 15 months from his White House retirement, the likelihood that the U.S. will do anything of consequence to change the status quo on the ground is slim. It seems extremely unlikely that Obama will risk a direct conflict with Putin. Any hope of a no-fly zone in Syria, or even an intensification of U.S. airstrikes, is likely gone as well. Indeed, with Europe under tremendous pressure from the crush of Syrian refugees, the fear among Sunni Arabs is that the West will latch on to Putin and Iran as the only hope for reining in Assad.

But that’s not why Russian troops are now fighting in Syria. They are there to prop up Assad by helping him destroy “terrorists”—defined as anyone fighting against his regime. It’s been about four and a half years since Syria’s civil war commenced—since it became a “geopolitical Chernobyl.” The meltdown may have only just begun.

Operation Greystone

Shortly after the September 11, 2001 attacks, President Bush called an emergency meeting in his cabinet Room, calling together the major defense and CIA officials.

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Not much earlier, CIA Director J. Cofer Black and top officials had prepared a plan to take down Al-Qaeda. Black approached President Bush with this plan immediately afterwards. Bush had just given the CIA a very broad approval to enter Afghanistan and carry out operations against the terror group Al-Qaeda in any way it pleased.

CIA Operatives entered at least a dozen different countries, including Afghanistan, and began training locals and government security forces to track down insurgents and terrorists.

Elite CIA Operatives trained northern Alliance soldiers in Afghanistan; the Taliban fell from power within a matter of months.

We now know that Operation Greystone involved, in large part, inaccurate drone strikes and secret prison-based interrogations of high-risk terrorists who simply disappeared during the course of the operation.

Realizing a greater potential threat facing America post 9/11, intelligence agencies became more secretive and cautious. They took on a greater role by phone tapping and tracking emails and created Operation Greystone enacted by President Bush which it sent CIA in front of the military for the first time, in order to go after Al Qaeda in Afghanistan which was the first start of a new covert was style.

Realizing we were facing a far greater potential terrorist threat and whereas most wars are a show of power, Operation Greystone began as an infiltration for information.

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CIA operatives entered at least a dozen different countries, including Afghanistan who joined up with the Northern alliance, a resistance force made up of rebels and from the shadows effectively began tracking down insurgents and terrorists who were paid to hunt down, fight and kill.  These operations operated in the shadows effectively dismantling the Taliban which led to numerous victories and dubbed as the “War on Terror”.

Elite CIA operatives trained Northern Alliance soldiers in Afghanistan; the Taliban fell from power within a matter of months.

We now know that Operative Greystone involved, in large part, inaccurate drone strikes and secret prison-based interrogations of high-risk terrorists who simply disappeared during the course of the operation.

One event that raised concerns of the scope of government power was a drone missile that blew up a vehicle occupied by an Al Qaeda leader. Although the government called it a success and celebrated, many were unaware of the power of the government weapons and the ability of the government to kill easily.

The major problem is that because everything is now done in secret, no one truly knows the extent to which the government is performing.

A second occurrence was the enhanced interrogation techniques that ensured, such as water boarding which is considered torture but was labeled as an enhanced technique and approved by the Justice Department.

In addition, the CIA had created a series of “black sites” throughout the world, which are prison camps for people to be tortured in. Again, in complete secrecy.

Vice President Dick Cheney and Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld began a program called Joint Special Operations Command, which singles out terrorist leaders and kills them one by one. They don’t call themselves a covert operation but instead military operation to avoid needing approval of president and effectively doing as they please. JSOC operates with CIA special activities division.

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Rumsfeld also created the Office of Special Plans, which created links that the CIA would not release. It was used to create the link between Saddam Hussein and Al Qaeda. It has “all source clearance,” the ability to access all information.

The OSP uses unapproved troops, acting independently and with mainly political intent in Iraq such as in summer of 2004 when the CIA led troops to Pakistan with attacks to defeat Al Qaeda and terrorists.

They then attacked Iraq to prevent damage from weapons of mass destruction and Saddam Hussein, and eventually led to the destruction of the NSA at home. It intercepts phone calls and emails without warrant, in all effort of preventing another 9/11.

This was allowed by the Terrorist Surveillance Program, enacted by Bush.

At this time, these new anti-terrorist groups have far more power than they should, being not regulated and also closed off to public knowledge.

In fact, after 8 months, it turned out there was not any “weapons of mass destruction” at all in Iraq, and the CIA took blame for all intelligence failure. It begs the question of just how much they know, and the lack of reason behind their activity.

A few years later, Obama was sworn in and swore to end invading privacy. Yet it turns out he reauthorized many programs including Greystone to find Osama bin Laden. JSOC raids, drone strikes, and essentially every program was kept or increased in order to continue fighting a “War on Terror”.

About 1.5 trillion dollars has been spent so far, and yet the only notable achievement is the death of Osama bin Laden. Perhaps instead of all this need to keep all actions secret, the government updates the public so it can realize if a search such as for WMD’s is hopeless and stop activity on it, and then try to refocus on other good leads on terrorist groups.

Drones are “Unmanned Aerial Vehicles” capable of delivering guided missiles to targets up to 1800 miles away. They are relatively small, equipped with a camera and controlled remotely from an operator on the ground. Since they are unmanned, drones greatly reduce the risk and cost of requiring a pilot and can effectively target key enemy positions.

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The CIA uses drones to conduct targeted killings of Taliban members and other militant groups.  In effect, it targets and eliminates insurgents on the ground without the implementation of need of excessive boots on the ground and unnecessary loss of ground troops. In turn, it also saves the lives of thousands of victims at the hands of the very growing numbers of extremists looking to dominate the world.

When it comes to drone strikes, the UN Human Rights Council fears that the United States has not taken proper accountability and precautionary and precautionary measures in conducting these targeted killings. According to Philip Alston, “the UN special Rappaorteurs on extrajudicial summary on arbitrary executions stated, “the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is running a programme that is killing a significant number of people, and there is absolutely no accountability in terms of the relevant international law.” My query to Mr. Alston is has he been to Iraq, Syria Kobane to see firsthand the thousands of beheading at the hands of ISIS the crimes against humanity of ISIS/ISIL killing hundreds of children and infants and the raping of women as young as 6 years old? Boys given automatic weapons and grenades and sent to suicide school instead of elementary school to kill all “non-believers”.

Since 2004, the Special Activities Division of the CIA had conducted hundreds of drone strikes in northern Pakistan. By the end of Obama’s first term in office, the CIA had conducted 44 drone strikes in Pakistan, killing approximately 400 people. In the years following, the number of strikes increased dramatically, and by 2011, the CIA had conducted over 240 drone strikes in Pakistan. The Obama administration maintains that the drone program is classified, and thus they are unable to reveal specific information about the targeted killings. Consequently, when such a program is classified, serious accountability and human rights dilemmas emerge.

A 2nd Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment Soldier provides overwatch on an Afghan valley during Operation Verendrye near the Afghan-Pakistan border.

Going into the 21st century, posturing and humane reasoning would dictate that the CIA must recognize the potential dangers of wielding such a powerful network of drones. With such a network, the CIA could hypothetically kill anyone on its “target list” from a remote location halfway across the world, effectively dehumanizing the entire process of assassination. The CIA must be sure to follow UN guidelines, while simultaneously maintaining a level of secrecy that gives it an advantage over terrorist organizations. The CIA must also be cautious of overusing drones also one would posture. The purpose of employing drones in Pakistan is to defeat terrorist organizations operating in the area but excessive use of drones may increase the already growing anti-American sentiment in the region. Will drones make America too powerful for its own good?

If drones are extremely effective is waging the war on terror, we cannot ignore it. We must not only continue the effective campaign but escalate it without mercy and conduct a “search and destroy” ground attack with “boots on the ground” giving us maximum exposure to eliminate any threat.

CRISIS IN SYRIA

The U.S. stance is to train Syrian opposition forces by the U.S. Military to defend its territory rather than to seize it back from the Islamic State.

The Syrian fighters are essential to defeating the Islamic State as countries like Turkey, Jodan and Qatar stand by. However these assembled units under the Obama administration’s will not be able to capturing key towns from the militants without U.S. Combat teams which Obama has ruled out. The Syrians then will be tasked to only preventing ISIL to reach beyond the control it maintains.

Military officials also want U.S. and allied special operations troops to advise opposition forces if those forces are thrust into combat, helping them to fight effectively and reducing the chances that the new units will disintegrate in the heat of battle.

You cannot field an effective force if you’re not on the ground to advise and assist them,” said a senior U.S. military officer with extensive experience in training the Iraqi and Afghan militaries.

Obama’s unwillingness to deploy ground combat forces is rooted in concern that American troops would be drawn into a long, bloody war in the Middle East.

Obama position is to have our military train as many as 5,00 Syrian fighters a year as an effective opposition force, not just a hit-and-run group of rebels. The first units are expected to be deployed in roughly six months. The plan is for them to safeguard cleared areas and end up being a defensive force more than an offensive force.

Lt. Gen. William Mayville, the director of operations for the Pentagon’s Joint Staff, said the opposition fighters would receive basic training and it will have some effect but not a decisive effect in the battle against the Islamic State.

A defensive opposition force also could allow President Bashar al-Assad’s government to regain territory it has lost to the Islamic State, which has been pummeled — but remains far from defeated — by hundreds of U.S. and coalition air strikes over the past month.

The long range of basic training will not suffice in the war on ISIS. Syrian militants in 6 months to a year cannot reverse Islamic State gains and certainly will not destroy the infrastructure that have enabled them to operate successfully in Iraq and elsewhere..

Those who have fled the country as refugees most likely will not want to return to their war-ravaged homeland. And some may turn to fight for ISIS

U.S. troops intends to use basic training sessions which will focus on unit discipline and elementary combat skills and advanced training in the future. This is called long ranging with hopes of engagement down the road.

Administration officials say technological advancements will allow the U.S. military to provide a degree of air support to Syrian forces without having to stand shoulder to shoulder with them. They note that in Iraq, U.S. commanders recently employed surveillance aircraft, including drones, to identify Islamic State militants near the Mosul Dam, striking them in proximity to Kurdish forces.

US officials are also talking to Jordan, Qatar and Turkey about training camps being established in Saudi Arabia. This is sending a evident message that this recruitment effort there is no U.S. commitment and our unwillingness to commit to toppling Assad and ISIS but rather sitting on th sidelines and watching from afar.

John McCain sated that it is immoral to “fight and die when we’re not going to protect them from Bashar Assad’s barrel bombs or from ISIS…You’re not going to get people to volunteer to do that.”

Some senior Defense Department officials advised that involving the use of covert operatives and private contractors reporting to the CIA, not the Pentagon, who could provide combat advice to Syrian forces and summon air support but a senior Arab official said such a request would be unlikely to receive an enthusiastic response among coalition members if the United States did not also commit troops.

Either way you look at it, basic training over a year period is sending more lambs to slaughter. Air atrikes had proven to be effective but now long will the effectiveness be to topple a terrorist group hell bent on destroying everything in its path with an instatiable quench for power.

Winning the War against ISIS

US-led air strikes in northern Syria have failed to interrupt the advance of Islamic State (Isis) fighters closing in on a key city on the Turkish border. That answers the question whether or not, the determination of ISIS with American air strikes alone is effective.

Almost two weeks after the Pentagon extended its aerial campaign from Iraq to neighboring Syria in an attempt to take on Isis militants in their desert strongholds, Kurdish fighters said the bombing campaign was having little impact in driving them back.

Air strikes alone are really not enough to defeat Isis in Kobani or elsewhere which the Kurdish fighters desperately are trying to defend from the advancing militants. They are besieging the city on three sides, and fighter jets simply cannot hit each and every Isis fighter on the ground.

ISIS has stepped up it s game while Obama steps off and not bringing in our troops to move to a ground attack while our allies are at the ready.

 

Even the Pentagon has reported daily on its aerial missions over Iraq and Syria since first deciding to go after Isis two months ago that it can not pinpoint exact locations.

It is obvious that the aerial bombardment is not sufficient to turn the tide on the ground and the U.S. has unsettled those in the US-led coalition, including the UK government, who have signed on with the air war and not taking the ground fight to Isis.

In Washington, military hawks continue to argue for an escalation of the war in Syria and Iraq with the deployment of US ground troops – a move that Barack Obama has repeatedly ruled out.

The strategy of aerial bombardment is not going to work to destroy Isil You cannot destroy Isil without a ground component. The UK echoes these words that air power alone will not win a campaign like this. They also ceased the air strikes into Syria.

The FSA (Free Syria Army) is joining now the YPG with the Turks that is currently battling ISIS in Kobani. Turkish tanks right now have took up positions on the Syrian border while Obama sits back posturing and unwilling to join a coalition on the ground who is calling on the international community to defend Kobani and other areas and countries and end ISIS. If Isis takes Kobani, they will be right on the border with Turkey.

The countries who surround Iraq are Saudi Arabia (home of Osama bin Laden), Turkey, Iran, and Kuwait. Countries like the UK was the last to join the coalition with countries who are already in the coalition like Australia, Germany, France, Netherlands, Turkey (offering assistance but no military aid), Saudi Arabia (training and land support), Belgium, Canada, Jordan, (providing Intel), Egypt, Qatar, Albania, Estonia, Hungary, Bahrain, Denmark and Italy.

Turkey, the key neighboring country with military might to crush ISIS has tanks at the Iraq border and is at the ready to begin a ground attack. Turkey has a very strong military force. Other countries are at the ready while Obama is posturing.

 

One would think that with so many countries acting in concert, we would be able to crush ISIS systemactically with limited loss of life with our coalition forces. The end game is evident. We need to accomplish two goals; exterminate every ISIS member and create a coalition force to root out and exterminate all larvae from these maggot groups.

Obama has taken some steps against ISIS, namely bombing strikes in Iraq. But he must do more. He understimated ISIS and overestimated Iraqi might as we in turn have overestimated US leadership.

Perhaps ISIS will be a wake-up call for this president. Perhaps he will do the right thing. He should be pressing our allies as hard as he can to join the fight.

Obama is writing and saying some of the right things. Now let’s see what he’ll actually do.

Our Government has Armed and Trained ISIS

The United States with the aid and guidance of the CIA had a hand in arming ISIS. In 2013, “ISIS fighters aided a [Supreme Military] council arms depot filled with weapons and ammunition, funded by the Gulf states and funneled to the council with the guidance of the Central Intelligence Agency.

The CIA has been known to run guns to terrorists (freedom fighters) in the past, arming Contras in Nicaragua and Syrian rebels. This practice allows our government to arm our enemies so they can justify going to war with them later. Our government has been conducting this practice for decades. Sending military aid (weapons and ammunition) to foreign countries which ultimately end up in the hands of our enemy states and kill thousands of our American military and scores of innocent civilians. So, who are the decision makers behind all of this, look no further than the President who approves it and shakes the hands of our enemy nations leaders.

ISIS has been in large part supported by the United States and its allies both directly and indirectly. This monstrous group that has begun to dominate parts of Syria and Iraq, has many members that were trained in Jordan by the U.S. back in 2012. These rebels were being groomed to squash the al-Assad regime in Syria with the Free Syrian Army, but apparently many of these well-trained rebels got more ambitious. They wanted to be part of the new Islamic State and joined ISIS instead.

ISIS has been receiving funds from private individuals based in U.S. allied countries like Kuwait, Qatar, and possibly Saudi Arabia. After seizing hundreds of millions of dollars worth of U.S. military equipment from the Iraqi Army who abandoned it, ISIS is also well armed.

At the same time it emerged that the U.S. State Department had hired an Al-Qaeda offshoot organization, the February 17th Martyrs Brigade, to “defend” the Benghazi Mission months before the attack.

There was a leak about smuggling operations when it emerged that the CIA had been subjecting its Operatives to monthly polygraph tests in an effort to keep a lid on details of the arms smuggling operations being leaked.

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CIA agents were on the ground in Benghazi during the attack and that the polygraph tests were mandated in order to prevent Operatives from talking to Congress or the media about a program that revolved around secretly helping to move surface-to-air missiles out of Libya, through Turkey, and into the hands of Syrian rebels. Key Syrian rebel leaders later defected to join ISIS.

In addition to ISIS obtaining weapons from Benghazi, many members of the group were also trained by the United States at a secret base in Jordan in 2012. Many of the United States’ biggest allies in the region, including Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Turkey and Qatar, have all bankrolled and armed ISIS militants.

So what weapons do ISIS possess do massacre Iraqi and American military and civilian live? There are M16 Assault Rifle, AK47’s, M79 Rockets for anti-tank which are all marked “property of US Govt”. According to General Thomas McInerney, he ankowleged that we “help build ISIS”.

Alliance against ISIS

Two of Jordan’s top pro-al-Qaida ideologues Abu Qatada and Abu Mohammed al-Maqdisi have been commiserating and Jordan’s priorities appear to have shifted because of the mounting threat posed by the Islamic State group, an al-Qaida offshoot that has seized large areas of neighboring Syria and Iraq, sending shivers through the kingdom.

Abu Qatada and al-Maqdisi have denounced some of the group’s practices as un-Islamic and has brought an onslaught of followers from these preachers who after their release from prison had nothing to do with politics.

But the clerics’ outspokenness points to ways the U.S.-led fight against the group is upending old assumptions in the Middle East. At the core of issue: the Islamic State group is viewed by some regional players as an existential threat, creating an unlikely mix of allies and reshaping regional priorities.

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Longtime enemies such as the US and Iran now find themselves fighting a common enemy, as do Iraq’s Arabs and Kurds. Arab states, such as Qatar and its Gulf neighbors, have at least temporarily put aside their differences in the fight against the militants.

One-time rivals view the Islamic State as a threat to their national security interests. This purported coalition has quickly grown since the U.S. first launched air strikes against Islamic State targets in Iraq followed by bombardments in Syria this month.

Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain and Jordan have participated in attacks in Syria, while Qatar hosts an air base used by the coalition. France, the Netherlands, Denmark, Belgium and Britain are among European countries contributing to U.S. efforts to hit the Islamic State group in Iraq.

The shakeup of alliances is perhaps most dramatic in Syria, ravaged by a civil war between President Bashar Assad’s troops and Sunni Muslim-led rebels, including Islamic State fighters and al-Qaida’s local branch, the al-Nusra front.

Saudi Arabia and Qatar appear to be the most active supporters of the armed opposition seeking to topple Assad. How long they are willing to do so is unclear. Qatar’s participation in the coalition is significant. It has been under mounting political pressure over its backing of Islamist groups such as the Muslim Brotherhood and its ties with Hamas.

It might be a grand facade but on the surface a brotherhood of enemies are coming together to fight a greater foe, a greater threat. For example to push the GCC (alliance of six Gulf states) together against the Sunni extremists in Syria. No matter what however, expect a long fight against these Islamic State militants.

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Hopefully, we will also see by shifting the priority to destroying the Islamic State group is also creating new opportunities for indirect collaboration, even with sworn enemies. We cannot overlook each countries independent agendas and be on watch.

What we are fighting is not just a terrorist organization, but the embodiment of a malicious ideology that must be defeated in its entirety. The ideology of ISIS is the greatest danger that the world will face in the next decade. They must be erased and our enemies must be carefully monitored. Our country must not bend, break or bow. NEVER SURRENDER!

The Massacre of Shiites – U.S. Accountability

Our own country sanctioned by Obama at a cost of billions of taxpayer dollars to train Iraqi soldiers has unfolded in many wars. The largest way is leading to the massacre of Shiites (ISIS) taken and slaughtered by Sunni Militants from the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.

The massacre was no different and was perpetuated by ISIS which came after another massacre of Iraqi soldiers stationed at Camp Speicher, a former American army base in Tikrit, Hussein’s hometown.

The suspected scale of the massacre — ISIS claimed it killed 1,700 Shiite soldiers which was confirmed to be accurate which would make it the deadliest sectarian atrocity in Iraq’s recent history.

The story of the massacre tells as much about the woeful state of the Iraqi military, a force created and trained by the United States at a cost of billions of dollars, as it does about the cruelty of ISIS.

The conquests of ISIS has demonstrated the psychological effects to this author to the direct victim of victim offender. When the US left Iraq, the war in Iraq was not over for the Sunnis and Shiites, In fact, a new civil unrest and a new faction emerged in the form of barbaric terrorism without limitations. The culture of Iraqis is not for forgiveness. They are from the desert; their culture is for revenge.

The United States encouraged the Shiites to rise up against Saddam Hussein who in turn slaughtered tens of thousands of Shiites as the U.S. stood by when the uprising against Hussein’s rule in 1991 was encouraged by American officials. But the United States then stood by as Mr. Hussein’s security forces slaughtered tens of thousands of people which explains why Shiites in the south never trusted the Americans when they invaded in 2003.

The certainty now, is that ISIS will continue to massacre anyone that stands in their way or opposes them. History has a way to repeat itself and revenge does come back with vengeance.